Now and Then

I didn’t set out to be a writer/photographer/musician, but what’s behind you often points to what’s ahead. Going through the ol’ picture file, I ran across a few photos of then…

Then

My qualifications for the job were the ability to sit for extended periods of time (I was a secretary most of my life), an acute attention to detail (lest you run over folks with the back of your trailer while making wide right turns), a spotless driving record, a sense of adventure, and an affinity for shifting gears. (I learned to drive in my Dad’s ol’ Chevy pickup with a “three on the tree.”)

Somehow The Man Of Few Words’ proposal (marriage and career-wise) tickled my fancy. For nearly ten years, I wrestled with road conditions, inched through traffic jams, secured cargo, tried to be a blessing to other drivers (my forté was praying folks down the road — including myself) and lived in a space smaller than a walk-in closet.

Home Away From Home

Most of the time I shared it with The Man Of Few Words (he’d drive the day shift; I’d drive nights) and we both lived to tell about it. Other times — many times — I’d head for points unknown in a separate rig. It was confidence-building, thrilling, and scary, but the lure of “around the bend” appealed to my soul and propelled me onward… plus, it gave me plenty of time to think.

Possibilities

Hard work? You betcha. Here’s moi preparing to clean my flatbed.

Fall Cleaning

Then, it was a matter of doing what I had to do.

Now, I’m doing what inspires me.

Potential Picnic

Ironically, writing (et al) has proved to be as hard or harder than an eleven hour day behind the wheel, but I wouldn’t trade one second of it. I’m where (and who) I am now because of millions of miles and memories then.

Life is cumulative, don’t you think?

Enjoying sitting still,

~ Kimby

22 thoughts on “Now and Then

  1. Dear Kimby,

    What and intriguing and beautiful background that you had. It is this accumulation of experiences which builds confidence, determination, perseverance and most important of all, character. I love that photo of the road with the snow capped mountains.

    Despite all our ups and downs, when we look back through the years, those experiences are always perfect because they have become a unique you.

    • Chopinand, your comment touched my heart. Life’s been an interesting ride! The mountain photo was taken in the pre-digital camera days (had to scan it, etc.) but that’s just one example of the incredible scenery I was blessed to see. Happy you could see it, too, and glad you enjoyed it.

  2. I love your eloquence and how you can draw your thoughts together so artistically! Life is cumulative, for sure. Thank you for sharing some pictures from your big rig days – so neat to see that part of your past. :)

    • Veronica, thank you so much. Most of our photos from “the trucking days” were taken with me behind the camera. It was fun to run across one taken by The Man Of Few Words of me “in action.” ;)

    • My pleasure, Yelena! The person behind each blog has a life-story to tell, which is why I recently re-did the links on my blog roll (including yours) to go to their “About” page whenever possible. :) Thanks for witnessing this chapter in my story! xo

  3. I have NO IDEA how you did this, Kim…yes, you do whatcha gotta do, but just reading about this and knowing the adventure in it, I’m hoping in another life, an 18-wheeler is in my stars…I can only imagine the stories you have…and, you, my love, have my ultimate most tenacious respect…this ain’t no job for a weenie…you’re one dang strong woman…your life story is full of mystery and even more things that continue to inspire me! xoxo

    • Ally, looking back on it now, it was sheer grit, true love, and God’s plan that made this possible. There’s no other explanation for it! (And thanks for your affirmations, xo.) Your comment about 18 wheelin’ in another life got me thinkin’ about food trucks… just imagine the BIG kitchen you could appoint in the back of a “box” (van trailer)… ;)

    • Catherine, the scariest “cargo” I could imagine hauling would be people! (Bus driving doesn’t appeal to me either and I have utmost respect for those who do.) I hear ya on getting lost and elusive parking spaces… yup, been there, done that. ;)

  4. I never picked you for a truck driver! I’d be terrified. Maybe not so much on the open road but coming into cities dealing with peak-hour traffic and narrow roads would do me in for sure. It’s great you were able to work together xx

    • Charlie, in my experience fear was directly proportional to knowing or not knowing what to do. Thankfully, I had an exceptional instructor (The Man Of Few Words) and if THAT isn’t the ultimate test for “compatibility,” I surely don’t know what is. ;) xo

  5. I think you’d mentioned your trucking days but I love reading about it with more detail. I just love that life is cumulative. I remember hearing that Steve Jobs wouldn’t have created Apple had he not dropped out of school and taken a calligraphy class.

  6. I can’t even drive a car, let alone a truck! Lol! Kimby, I think you should share more pix on what you’re doing to ease our curiosity. I’m sure your readers like me would love to read more about your interesting job :) Amazing!

    • Shirley, I’d chauffeur you anywhere! ;) Actually, I “semi-retired” so to speak (pun intended) several years ago… but unfortunately, photographic evidence is few and far between during the trucking days (hard to take pictures when driving) and The Man Of Few Words wasn’t always there to snap photos of moi. I’ll see what I can dig up in the “archives” to appease your curiosity, even if it’s just a story or two (or three or four..) about life on the road! xo

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